• Books
    Name: Ruth Butler
    Email: ruth.butler@slps.org
     
    Room Number(s): 226
    Subject(s): American, English, Freshman and 
    World Literature & Composition.
    Practical English,
    Intro to Study and Grammar, Life Skills and Government/Civics.
    Personal phone: 314-568-4981
     
     
     
    Teacher's Message: As we all work under these difficult circumstances I will do my best to serve and provide instruction. Please be safe and take care of each other.
     
    Inspirational Quote: 
     
    "Learn how to be happy with what you have while you pursue all that you want." Jim Rohn
     
    Enjoy and hold your loved ones close...
     
     
    Our lessons will include:
    Reading for understanding and connections
    Grammar and structure of writing 
    Test-taking and study strategies 
     
     
     
    Biography:
    B.A. Social Studies Elem. Ed. and Special Education Mild to Moderate K-12
    25 years in Education
    14 years of Certification in Special Education,
    A lifetime of purpose and calling to teaching, a Labor of Love. 
     
     
     
     

    In Freshman Literature and Composition 150 students will use single focus texts each quarter to study the major literary genres in-depth. Students will closely examine, through reading, research, and writing, each work’s historical context, themes, and literary elements. The guiding question around which each quarter's work is built will be, “Who am I, and what does it mean to be a part of a society?” Built around the focus texts will be a variety of other, shorter works representing a wide range of genres and viewpoints that support and supplement students' exploration. Throughout students will write in the following rhetorical modes: Summary and paraphrase, Autobiographical narrative, Expository, Persuasive/Argumentative, and Creative. In addition, fundamental vocabulary words/skills and key research concepts will be applied. Where possible and appropriate, the curriculum will recommend connections to concepts and texts taught in American Government 150.

     
     

    In World Literature & Composition 250, Students will continue building upon the habits of mind established in Freshman Literature & Composition 100, as they probe literature more deeply to understand increasingly complex philosophies and perspectives, extending their exploration of self and society. The guiding question for World Literature will be, “What does it mean to be a part of this world? What stories and struggles help define the human experience?” Major works will be supplemented with mythology, short fiction essays, and poetry representing major cultures, philosophies, and genres. Throughout students will write in the following rhetorical modes: Summary and Paraphrase, Comparison/Contrasts, Persuasive, Expository, and Classification. Vocabulary words/skills and fundamental research concepts will continue to spiral upward throughout the course. Where feasible and appropriate, the curriculum will recommend connections to concepts and texts taught in World History 250.

     
     

    In American Literature & Composition 350 students focus will shift to the story of American society. The guiding question for American Literature & Composition 300 will be, “Who are we as a people?’ and “What does it mean to be American?” Students will examine what literary history tells us about changes in American society and the people who live here; shifting social values, emerging social movements, and ongoing struggles. The course will take a largely chronological perspective that corresponds closely to American history. Major works will be supplemented with short fiction and nonfiction essays, as well as poetry written by significant American writers. Throughout students will write in the following rhetorical modes: Summary and paraphrase, Literary analysis, Problem-Solution, Expository, and Persuasive. Vocabulary words/skills and research concepts will continue to spiral upward, with an emphasis on media literary and research-based literary analysis. Where feasible and appropriate, the curriculum will recommend connections to concepts and texts taught in American History 350.

     
     

    In English Literature and Composition, students will round out their study of Communication Arts by turning their attention to the works of English speaking cultures, starting with the literature of Great Britain and spreading out across the globe. Guiding questions in English literature will be, “What is ‘English,’ how has English affected the world, and how has the world affected English?” The course will examine British literature as well as works representing the Commonwealth. The course will take a combined chronological, thematic and cultural approach. Major works will be supplemented with mythology, short fiction essays, and poetry representing significant writers, philosophies, and cultural perspectives. Throughout students will write in the following rhetorical modes: Summary and paraphrase, Informative (research-based project), Persuasive, Comparison/Contrast, Cause and Effect. Research-related skills and concepts will compromise and important part of the course, with particular emphasis on integrating researched information with students' own ideas and writings; quoting from and citing sources; and creating a Works Cited page.

     

     
     
     
     Roosevelt Grading Scale:
     
    A     90-100
    B     80-89
    C     70-79
    D     60-69
    F     0-59