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Dakota Fry

Greeting,

My name is Dakota Fry, I have recently joined AESM L’ouverture staff as a trauma therapist. I can provide support for students with challenges such as, but not limited to anxiety, peer relationships, depression, and motivation. I am excited to spend this school working with you and your students.

  • The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma

    by Bessel van der Kolk M.D. Year Published: 2015

    In The Body Keeps the Score, Dr. Bessel van der Kolk, one of the world’s foremost experts on trauma, uses recent scientific advances to show how trauma literally reshapes both body and brain, compromising sufferers’ capacities for pleasure, engagement, self-control, and trust. He explores innovative treatments—from neurofeedback and meditation to sports, drama, and yoga—that offer new paths to recovery by activating the brain’s natural neuroplasticity. Based on Dr. van der Kolk’s own research and that of other leading specialists, The Body Keeps the Score exposes the tremendous power of our relationships both to hurt and to heal—and offers new hope for reclaiming lives.

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  • Relational-cultural play therapy: Reestablishing healthy connections with children exposed to trauma in relationships.

    Relational-cultural play therapy: Reestablishing healthy connections with children exposed to trauma in relationships.

    Children who have experienced trauma in relationships, such as direct physical or sexual abuse, or who have witnessed crimes or domestic violence, often carry forward symptoms of traumatic stress. Children with posttraumatic stress may become withdrawn or aggressive, clingy or distant with caregivers, oversleep and overeat, or develop insomnia and eat too little (A. Banks, 2006, Relational therapy for trauma, Journal of Psychological Trauma, Vol. 5, pp. 25–47). These physical and psychological symptoms are further complicated when children have experienced trauma that disrupts their primary relationships. In this article, we will discuss and illustrate a relational–cultural approach to play therapy designed to help children who have experienced trauma in relationships to reconnect to others in healthy and emotionally beneficial ways. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)

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